Digital Art & Design: Why You Should Not Overlook Color

Digital Art & Design: Why You Should Not Overlook Color

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Color in Design

As a young designer, I have always been inspired by the little things. I walk around and realize cracks in the concrete that create shapes, enjoy the gradient of a sunset, and see patterns in the most unusual places. It is like music to my eyes. I absolutely love to find meaning in color, shapes, lines, or any other elements of a design. I am a strong believer that everything you put out in the world no matter what it is (poster, advertisement, book, photograph, etc.) should have some type of thoughtful process behind its creation. This post will help you figure out how to find meaning or inspiration for your designs through color.

As I explained in my visual consistency video, color has meaning. If you are designing a poster, for example, find colors that speak to the choices that you will make. Will the background be a washed-out blue because you love that color? Nope! Wrong answer. Think deeper about the choices you make; be in touch with your inner Yoda young grasshopper. You may decide to pick out the washed-out blue because the poster is for a summer concert series where people can relax. Let me break it down for you:

Washed-out?: This could be a gradient of some sort where you could fade a light blue with a white that helps add to the summer time feel.

Light Blue: Calming, chill, and joyful color that is easy on the eyes and speaks to the feeling of the moment at the concert.

Have your colors speak for your thought process and design. Break down your color choices to give you a clear understanding as to why you have made the choices you have made.

Currently I am developing an identity for a neighborhood in Austin, Texas called Clarksville. It is a wonderful place that I am researching for a design project and recently I gave the place a nice photo session. I was walking around and felt so in touch with the community and instantly felt inspired. I took photos of colors that resonated with the feel of the neighborhood so I could develop a color palette that accurately represents Clarksville.

I recommend finding a way to feel in touch with what you are designing. Are you making a poster for an event? Ask people who have attended the event before to tell you how it made them feel or if it inspired them in any way. Then take those feelings and express them on an art board.

Color is something that gives so much value to life so why not have it give value to your designs.

 

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